Fort George Part 2 - The Visit

Posted on: Mon, 10/24/2016 - 15:15 By: Mike
My hotel in Radisson, QC

After two days of driving, experiencing the James Bay Road, and eventually falling asleep under the blanket of Northern Lights, I awoke Tuesday morning excited and raring to go.  I was to meet Roger, my contact, at his business in Chisasibi, a First Nations community about 100 km west of Radision, QC.

Fort George Part 1 - The Trip

Posted on: Mon, 10/10/2016 - 15:15 By: Mike
Gassing up before the big drive.
I set out on an October Sunday morning, ready to begin what I knew was going to be an adventure.  Although I had many kilometres between me and my goal, I was eager to begin, and even more eager to arrive.  While I was discounting the long drive there as merely an obstacle, I would eventually realize that it was as important as the destination.

A 103-year-old Swinger

Posted on: Mon, 09/12/2016 - 15:15 By: Mike

Aerial view of the bridge.

As I drove to the Manitoulin Island community of Little Current, Ontario, luck was something that was foremost on my mind. First, I knew I was lucky to get this opportunity. Second, I would be extremely lucky if the forecast rain and potential thunderstorms held off until after I was finished. Finally, my luck would hit the trifecta if a boat would present itself at just the right time. If the last two elements came together as the first had, I would be a very happy person.

Where it Began - KL Sachsenhausen

Posted on: Mon, 08/10/2015 - 15:15 By: Mike

View of the main building from the outside.

One who follows history cannot possibly go to Germany without setting aside the time to visit at least one of the former Nazi camps. During our trip, we visited two in Germany, and two in Poland. This was the first we visited, which was fitting because it was, in fact, the first of the system of camps, and was intended to be the model by which the subsequent camps were to be made and operated.

Sydney Harbour Defenses

Posted on: Mon, 10/27/2014 - 15:15 By: Mike

Spotlight emplacement.

Sydney, Nova Scotia, served a vital role in the Allied war effort of World War II. It was a rally point for supply ships and their escorts providing war materiel, and it was a base for the ships and aircraft that helped to secure the routes those convoys would set out on. To that end, the harbour had to be protected against enemy ships or the submarines that were known to prowl the waters in search of targets or military intelligence.

Pioneer Church on a Colonization Trail

Posted on: Mon, 05/10/2010 - 15:15 By: Mike

Outside view of the log church.

One of many interesting aspects of Ontario's history is its so-called colonization roads. Surveys began in 1847 for the creation of roads that would open up lands between the Ottawa River Valley, and Georgian Bay for new settlement. The Public Lands Act, passed in 1853 granted free title to land provided you met the following criteria:

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